Full Dentures – Problems and Solutions

Millions of people worldwide wear full dentures.  While we often associate this aging, wearing full dentures is not just limited to older adults.  Illness, accidents — sometimes even pregnancy — can contribute to tooth loss and, in a number of cases, this affects younger individuals as well.

Young or old, the psychological consequences of losing teeth can be severe.

Several studies have suggested that a smile is very often the first thing people notice about another person.  So, losing one’s teeth can be devastating in a variety of ways.

Toothlessness may affect digestion. This, in turn, can influence nutrition and health.   There can be issues with self-esteem, intimacy, and a host of other areas most people wouldn’t normally take the time to consider.

This is stressful enough.  But having to now replace the teeth can also become stressful for some.

Many people worry about whether they will be able to eat with their dentures.  Will people notice that they are wearing them?  Will they sound funny when they speak?  Will it hurt to eat with the dentures? Will they be able to chew their food?  How will the dentures affect the ability to taste food? Will the dentures slip when they talk?  What can they afford?

Denture Profile

Dentures

These are natural concerns, but for the first-time wearer, they add up to a lot of unknowns.

The truth is that no two situations are alike. But almost all denture challenges have solutions.

Another thing to consider is that there are many ways to go about addressing total tooth loss.  The solutions depend upon a person’s preferences, financial options, and — frankly — anatomy.

If a person were building a house and they decided to hire an architect, the architect would undoubtedly first gather a lot of information about the project.  For example:  Where is he going to be building? What does the client want: a log cabin or a mansion?  What does the foundation look like?  What is the client’s budget?

In some ways, restoring a person’s smile is not too dissimilar.

For the person without teeth, they may be surprised to learn that there are multiple ways to go about replacing the teeth.  The length of time will vary with each approach, as well as the cost.

To help clarify the options and give some sense of the costs, I put together a report that helps discusses different levels of care, from simple to more complex. Included is a sense of the pros and cons of each approach, and a general price range at today’s rates.  Of course, this can vary widely from area to area and doctor to doctor.

There is no cost or obligation to download the report.  We just hope it helps to clarify some of the questions many people have about dentures.

Implant or Bridge? How to Decide (Part 2)

OK. So let’s say it has been decided: you are a candidate for an implant.

Now what?

You may have heard that getting an implant can take a long time. By contrast, you can have a bridge to replace your missing tooth in about two weeks or less. Isn’t that better?

Not so fast. It all depends.

Let’s look at a couple of scenarios. If you are replacing only one tooth and have two adjacent teeth here is what you should consider:

In order to place a bridge, you have to shave down those teeth so that they will support the bridge. This limits their longevity and may open the door to the need for additional work, such as root canal therapy in the future.

You should also understand that bridges don’t last forever.  The national average, according to university studies and insurance company estimates, is only five to fifteen years. If, you are in your twenties, a bridge can turn out to be much more costly over your lifetime.

Let’s see how this plays out:

For the sake of argument, consider that a person has lost their first molar. The 2013 national average price for crowns (the individual units that make up a bridge) was about $1160.  Since our hypothetical bridge has three units, that adds up to $3,480.  If existing fillings need to be replaced due to decay, it could cost another $500.  And if a root canal is needed because the filling is now closer to the nerve, this can cost as much as another $1,100 for a molar. Suddenly, the total bill can exceed $5,000 using our example.

In five to fifteen years the bridge may need replacement. Let’s be generous and say it lasts fifteen. Between the ages of 25 and 85, that’s four replacements – nearly an additional $14,000 – if nothing else is needed.

In the long run, replacing one tooth using a bridge can cost nearly $20,000 over your lifetime. And that’s assuming it is still in a condition that permits a new bridge.

What if instead we replace the tooth with an implant? At today’s rates, a traditional root form implant runs between $1,800 and $2,000 in my area.  An abutment (that’s the part which ties the implant and the implant crown together) will range in price from an average of $850 to $1,200.  Prices for implant crowns vary widely – though many dentists charge the same fee as they do for regular crowns. In this example, we’ll use the fee given above, so $1,160.

If we take the higher estimates here, we’re up to $4,360.  That’s only $880 more than our bridge in the earlier example’s “best case” scenario.

The difference? That implant (barring situations like an accident causing physical injury to the implant) has a good chance of lasting a lifetime. That’s a lot less than $20,000 over time if you go the bridge route.

I have had patients react in various ways to this analysis. Some tell me “I really don’t want to wait three to nine months, while wearing a temporary partial, for the implants to be ready.”  Others have said, “Well, if I’m going to have to replace a bridge down the road, or even end up with an implant later anyway – I might as well just do it now.”

Both arguments have their merits. But at least now you have some information that can help you make an informed choice.

Implant or Bridge? How to Decide (Part 1)

We hope we will never lose a single tooth.  Unfortunately, it happens sometimes.  We can lose a tooth for many reasons. I won’t delve into them in this article.  The purpose here is to help you to decide between a bridge and an implant, in the event that you have to make that choice.

Just so we are clear: No two situations are completely alike. I have neither seen nor evaluated your case and am simply discussing general principles. You should always consult a competent and licensed professional to assess your specific circumstance before making a decision that will affect both your health and finances. Nevertheless, here you are.  Either a tooth has been compromised and is lost already, or it is about to be extracted. If the idea of dental implants has crossed your mind, your dentist first has to determine whether you are a good candidate for the implants. The criteria can be broken down into three broad categories:

  1. Do you have any medical issues that may prevent successful placement of an implant?
  2. Do you have sufficient bone?
  3. Will your existing bite allow it?

So let’s get into it:

1. Medical Issues. Health conditions that could prevent an implant being placed may include, but are not limited to:

  • Diabetes
  • Recent heart attack or stroke
  • Immunosuppression
  • Drug abuse
  • Active treatment of malignancy
  • Intravenous bisphosphonate use

You should disclose anything you think could be a matter of concern with your dentist.  The success rate with dental implants is very high, but careful case selection is the key to success.

2. Sufficient Bone. Again, this needs to be determined by the implant surgeon. Your bone needs to be high enough and wide enough to accommodate the implant. If it isn’t, you may still qualify for a dental implant, but will likely require an additional procedure called bone grafting. Your dentist or implant specialist will determine your specific needs.

3. Your Bite. What does the bite have to do with anything?  There was a tooth there to begin with, right? Both implants – and natural teeth – survive longer when your teeth and jaw are in harmony. If your bite has collapsed – meaning the upper jaw and lower jaws are now too close to each other – there may not be enough room to place an implant without orthodontic (braces), or surgical, intervention.

Starting to sound a bit complicated?  Don’t worry, in most cases, the dentist can tell you pretty quickly if he feels implants will work for you. Sometimes, he needs additional screening tools to make the final call but, if he does, he’ll let you know that too.